FIA: 2014 F1 turbo engines will sound good

FIA: 2014 F1 turbo engines will sound good

From YallaF1.com

Honda V6 turbo engines dominated in the late eighties until the end of the first F1 turbo era in 1988

Jul.1 (GMM) Formula 1 engines of the new turbo era, set to come on stream in 2014, will still sound good in the wake of the current V8 era, the governing FIA has insisted.

BMW engineNormally aspirated BMW engine which powered Sauber 

The unique noise produced by powerful high revving engines has been an issue each time the regulations substantially changed, including when V8 engines became mandatory at the abolition of the V10 era for 2006.

But the proposed switch in 2013 from V8 to 1.6 litre four-cylinder turbo engines caused unprecedented angst, including from Bernie Ecclestone and the majority of his race circuit promoters, who threatened to boycott F1 if the cars sounded like “tin cans rattling”.

A compromise has been reached in the form of a 1.6 litre V6 turbo engine, producing 15,000rpm rather than the 12,000 proposed for the inline four rules, to debut in 2014.

In a media document on Thursday, the FIA denied the rev increase for V6s was in deference to the sound debate.

New Williams team mates Ayrton Senna (BRA) (left) and Damon Hill (GBR) unveil the Renault V10 engine powering the Williams FW16.  Formula One Testing, Estoril, Portugal, 18-20 January 1994.Ayrton Senna and Damon Hill unveil the Renault V10 engine powering the Williams FW16 in 1994  

“This parameter has been updated from 12,000 to 15,000rpm to allow engineers more flexibility in power and energy management,” read the statement.

“However, as a consequence of the new architecture and the change in rev-limit, the engine will sound different, but will remain representative of formula one,” claims the FIA.

The governing body also insists that the V6 engines will not use more fuel than under the defunct four-cylinder plan.

“The fuel flow limit will stay the same,” read the document. “The challenge will be even bigger than originally planned and will therefore enhance the technological lead of formula one.”

FIA Q&A Power Unit Regulations

1. The World Motor Sport Council voted on 29 June 2011. What did it decide?
Following consultation with the various Formula One stakeholders  and the current Formula One engine manufacturers, the WMSC has ratified the adoption of a V6 turbo engine to be used in Formula One from 2014 onwards. This required changes to the regulations initially adopted by the World Council on 3 June 2011. The full regulations applicable to the 2014 season will be published in due course.

The turbocharger fitted to the Ferrari 126CK. United States Grand Prix West, Rd1, Long Beach, California, USA.15 March 1981. BEST IMAGEThe turbocharger fitted to the Ferrari 126CK in 1981  

2. Will a V6 use more fuel, or have inferior economy compared with the original proposal?
No. To push the engineers to develop engine efficiency, the technical regulation imposes a fuel flow control. When evolving the regulation to fit with the manufacturers’ new request this parameter has not been changed. Thus the efficiency requirement will be unchanged.

3. Why has the rev limit been increased from 12,000rpm to 15,000rpm. Is this purely to enhance the sound of a Formula One car?
No. This parameter has been updated from 12000rpm to 15000 rpm to allow engineers more flexibility in power and energy management. However, as a consequence of the new architecture (V6) and the change in rev-limit, the engine will sound different, but will remain representative of Formula One.

4. Will the increase in rpm alter fuel consumption?
Absolutely not. As mentioned above, the fuel flow limit will stay the same. The technologies are the same and as a consequence any increase in rpm will constrain the engineers to work harder on reducing friction and gaining on engine efficiency. The challenge will be even bigger than originally planned and will therefore enhance the technological lead of Formula One.

Jean-Pierre Jabouille (FRA) debuted the Renault RS01, qualifying twenty-fourth and retiring on lap seventeen with a blown turbo. It was the debut appearance in F1 for Renault, a turbocharged engine (a Gordini 1.5 litre V6) and for tyre manufacturer Michelin.  British Grand Prix, Rd 10, Silverstone, England, 16 July 1977. BEST IMAGEJean-Pierre Jabouille gave turbo power it’s first serious debut in Renault RS01 at the 1977 British GP  

5. Has the FIA  retained the energy recover devices originally intended to be used in conjunction with the I4 engine?
Yes, the concept initially presented is respected. All of the technology intended for the I4 is still present. This new power plant will be a dramatic step forward in both fuel efficiency and in energy management.

6. Will those manufacturers already engaged in the development of a four-cylinder engine face increased costs now they need to redirect their resources toward designing a V6?
To our knowledge, five manufacturers were working on the proposed 4-cylinder engine. They will all need to adapt their project and this will surely involve some additional costs, depending on how advanced each project was. This evolution has been proposed and supported by all four engine manufacturers currently involved in Formula One.

7. Why is the introduction of the new generation of engines now being delayed by year?
The decision to delay the introduction until 2014 comes at the request of the four engine manufacturers currently involved in Formula One. Their request for extra time is linked to the change in architecture but also to ensure their projects are more robust (one of the goals of the project is to enhance engine durability to c.4000km)

Michele Alboreto (ITA) Ferrari 156/85 goes up in smoke. European Grand Prix, Brands Hatch, 6 October 1985Michele Alboreto’s Ferrari 156/85 goes up in smoke  

8. Will these energy recovery systems and other efficiency devices ultimately influence the development of road cars?
Yes. The clear need for the automotive industry to reduce emissions means energy management will increasingly become a key factor in the development of more efficient powertrains. Kinetic energy recovery is already applied in Formula One and the introduction of exhaust energy recovery will add another technology route to be explored. Formula One will also return to its role as a developer of turbo-charger technology. This research will have real-world benefits, contributing valuable knowledge that will be of use to future road car development.

Combustion engine specifications:

  • 1600cc, V6
  • 15000 rpm max
  • Direct fuel injection up to 500bar
  • Single turbocharger
  • Controlled fuel flow

Energy recovery and storage systems specifications:

  • Kinetic, 120kW on the rear wheels
  • Exhaust energy recovery linked to the turbocharger

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  2. Turbo rules devised to entice Audi into F1
  3. Another turbo V6 engine era for Formula 1
  4. Small turbo F1 engines to be reality for 2013
  5. Renault say 2013 engines will sound good

 

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